10/8/10

Women in Art Photography UK


Tess Hurrell,
 Chaology no. 1, 2006, 20 x 24 in., silver gelatin print, Ed. 4/8

If you happen to be in the UK stop by and check out Humble Arts Foundation's latest endeavor. I love the image above--there's some very interesting work by Tess Hurrell, see more here. All the info you need can be found in the press release below:


Women in Art Photography U.K.

CURATED BY JON FEINSTEIN & AMANI OLU
Private view: Thursday, October 14, 6 PM On view: Thursday, October 14 – Saturday, November 13, 2010 

MUSIC BY COZETTE
TASCHEN Store London 12 Duke of York Square 
London, SW3 4LY
 
Hours: Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri 10 AM – 6 PM; Wed & Sat 10 AM – 7 PM; Sun 12 – 6 PM 
Exhibiting photographers: Natasha Caruana, Noemie Goudal, Alicia Hart, Tess Hurrell, Emily Keegin, Karen Knorr, Agata Madejska, Zoe Maxwell, Laura Pannack, Regine Petersen, Sarah Pickering, Dana Popa, Clare Strand, Emma Weislander, and Tereza Zelenkova

TASCHEN and Humble Arts Foundation are pleased to present 
Women in Art Photography U.K., curated by Jon Feinstein and amani olu. Similar to its American counterpart, this exhibition attempts to avoid a decidedly “female” voice and instead presents the work of a stylistic variety of women photographers based in the U.K. The photographs in this exhibition transcend rigid categorical distinctions, and can easily fall across multiple genres within art photography. This ranges from constructed studio works to pictures that explore or comment on traditional notions of portraiture, still life, and landscape photography. Agata Madejska transforms everyday playgrounds into jarring, outer space sculptures, Laura Pannack transcends preconceived notions of youth culture in her tense, uncomfortable portraits of adolescents, and Sarah Pickering’s images of controlled test explosions explore the vulnerability of everyday life during wartime, and the construction of military preparedness. By placing a variety of styles and influences in the same context, the curators encourage viewers to draw abstract relationships between the works and challenge their own notions of what it means to photograph as a woman in the contemporary landscape. 

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